Camden outlines long term travel policies

Plans to increase walking and cycling, and to cut car ownership and usage in the London borough of Camden have been drawn up by the north London local authority.

Launched for consultation on Friday (2 November), the borough’s Draft Transport Strategy sets out long term transport policies for the area from 2019 to 2041.

Camden is targeting an increase in walking and cycling

Key amongst the policies is support for cycling infrastructure through the creation of a ‘borough-wide network of cycle routes that are safe, comfortable and accessible’.

The draft strategy suggests that this will consist of ‘primary’ routes using existing main road corridors, separating cyclists from general vehicle traffic and pedestrians, and ‘secondary’ routes that will mainly use quieter, residential streets.

The council will also seek to discourage non-essential motor traffic by looking to “restrict and reduce opportunities for inessential car ownership and use, both for journeys made within the borough and for traffic entering the borough”.

Reviewing parking charges for residents and visitors as well as exploring the feasibility of a workplace parking levy within the borough. The council has pledged to review parking charges for residents, and develop traffic restrictions to deter inessential car use and traffic ‘rat running’.

Anti-idling

Other measures include the roll out of additional infrastructure for plug-in vehicles, working with TfL on delivering low emission bus zones, as well as continuing enforcement against vehicle idling.

Councillor Adam Harrison (left) with Camden council enforcement officers

Camden has also pledged to create a network of area-based ‘School Low Emission Neighbourhoods’ across Camden, beginning with the Fitzjohn’s area as part of the borough’s ‘Neighbourhoods of the Future’ scheme, to deliver a package of measures to improve air quality in and around schools where air pollution hotspots have been observed.

Commenting on the strategy, Councillor Adam Harrison, Cabinet Member for Improving Camden’s Environment, said: “We want Camden to be as clean, green and sustainable as possible. This is even more the case at a time when we are still coming to terms with the full impact of air pollution on our health and carbon emission on our planet’s health.

“Changing how we travel is central to making progress on both of these fronts. We also need to keep Camden moving by ensuring the roads are clear for essential journeys for those who do need to use a car.

“To do this, many of us need to switch over to walking, cycling and taking public transport. Please take a look at our plans for transport in Camden and let us know your views.”